Fungal Forays

An assortment of Goose Creek fungi late August 2010

This collection of three images is posted just to remind myself what I’ve been up to these past few weeks photographically and botanically (though the latter term is only true in the era in which fungi were lumped with “everything not an animal” and therefore considered plants.)

Since the ample rain of early August, we’re back into a rainless period and the above-ground parts have pretty much dried up–or rotted: been consumed by other fungi who see in their brethren a food source–nothing personal. But when the next rains come, there promises to be a new surge of fungal forms to photograph. And I MIGHT be getting a new camera. (!)

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About

Fred First holds masters degrees in Vertebrate Zoology and physical therapy, and has been a biology teacher and physical therapist by profession. He moved to southwest Virginia in 1975 and to Floyd County in 1997. He maintains a daily photo-blog, broadcasts essays on the Roanoke NPR station, and contributes regular columns for the Floyd Press and Roanoke's Star Sentinel. His two non-fiction books, Slow Road Home and his recent What We Hold in Our Hands, celebrate the riches that we possess in our families and communities, our natural bounty, social capital and Appalachian cultures old and new. He has served on the Jacksonville Center Board of Directors and is newly active in the Sustain Floyd organization. He lives in northeastern Floyd County on the headwaters of the Roanoke River.

4 Comments on “Fungal Forays

  1. Beautiful photographs of your Goose creek fungi. do write a post on your new camera if you get it. Your photos are always so lovely that it would be interesting to know why you got a new camera. — barbara

  2. Question… First photo – what’s that next to the fungi (or in Italian, Funghi), batteries in a rubber band? Or, given that we are talking ‘shrooms – be they vials?

  3. I guess you have been mycologizing, not botanizing, but I’ve never heard that word, have you? I know you will like the bells and whistles on your new camera, but you sure don’t need it to improve the quality of your photography.

  4. So little rain up here in these parts of New England fungi are few and far between. You should rejoice!

    Bill:www.wildramblings.com

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