Someone in last night’s audience for the 16th SustainFloyd Movie Series event–the presentation of the movie, Chasing Ice–suggested that perhaps things would go differently in our actions towards personal change in the light of climate chaos if all politicians were required to come face to face with the 75 minutes of documented facts in this movie: the undeniable retreat of glaciers in Iceland, Greenland and Alaska over the period of just a few recent years. Nah. There are sadly too many people whose power …

Chasing a Livable Future in Floyd Read more »

I’m reminded of the well-known cartoon showing the primordial ooze evolving ever upward. It becomes a salamander that becomes an ape that becomes a caveman who becomes a modern man in the age of science. As of the last election, we can now take humanity’s first step back down the ladder of disorder as the sapient man of science devolves into Senator James Inhofe. Science was okay in its day but it has outlived its useful lifetime.  The Not-a-Scientists will take it from here. And just to be clear: The book, …

James Inhofe: The Greatest Hoax Read more »

I tried to imagine what the ancients must have made of a perihelion. It is one of the strangest celestial “omens” you might witness in the daytime sky. I took a picture, but not this one. Mine just shows an upside-down rainbow faintly overhead, and only pieces of this full feature-set of sky lights. We saw only the circumferential arc, the faint Parry supralateral and very faintly,  the upper tangent. The sun was below the local horizon, and at 2pm, the background brightness of …

Phenom Read more »

For Friday shoppers who want to jump to the punchline and avoid the punch, I give you the Nikon winners of the 2014 MicroPhotography competition that spawned this thread today.  I’ve been devoting some thought lately to my idiosyncrasies–those unique and perhaps peculiar ways of seeing, thinking and behaving particular to only me. Some of them I’m sure came with the package at Day One. Some of each of us consists of molecular hard-wired genetic instructions among which not all are as either-or as the dice-toss …

Small Wonder, Large Appreciation Read more »

Sorry, the title is from a weak resonance from an old B-grade sci-fi movie (in black and white, most likely) from the deep past.  In Toledo’s case, the blob is a known entity: cyanobacteria. In their earliest remnant forms, cyanobacteria–or Blue Green Algae–grew in these blobby shapes called stromatolites that you see in the image above. You’ll find them prominently featured in the early chapters of freshman biology texts, because we credit them with the early colonization of the land and the production of an atmosphere with increasing …

The Blob That Ate Toledo Read more »