Near Coles Knob in eastern Floyd County, many acres of former mature forest are being cut (down to what’s left of the topsoil) to create pasture to grow beef cattle. (Wood chips likely now on a freighter ship to Europe.) The carbon footprint of those cattle that will graze on land where carbon-storing oaks and hickories stood until this summer, would fall near the “high impact” range in this chart, especially if they are shipped to a feedlot for finishing and sold to consumers …

Field To Fork: Food Choices and the Future Read more »

Found in my collections of snippets, a quote from Wendell Berry, one of the few wise men of our era, in my opinion: To destroy a forest or an ecology or a species is an act of greater seriousness than we have yet grasped, and it is perhaps of graver consequence. But these destructions will mend. The forest will grow back, the natural balances will be restored, the ecological gap left by the destroyed species will be filled by another species. But to destroy …

Seeing the Forests Read more »

This is the first part of a four part series in the Floyd Press, first installment in this week’s edition. — FBF When the oak leaves fell from November trees along the crest above the house, we were shocked to discover that the rounded ridge beyond and above us was now as smooth as a baby’s bottom against the northern sky. The south-facing flank of Lick Ridge had been clearcut. The sight alarmed and upset me–and not just because the aftermath of a clearcut …

When Our Forests Disappear Read more »

It is true that the tomatoes are leggy and the peppers not a deep dark green as they should be. They seem to be telling me that they are in short supply of something–and probably on or all of N, P and K. I have a long list of excuses–and some reasons–why our garden is anemic this year. But I’ll save the whining and move right to one possible partial solution. For the P, I recommend pee. I still have the Starbucks cappuccino bottle …

PeeCycling Read more »