I drove past a garden this week white with Sevin dust or some other noxious agri-chemical pesticide. A pity, I thought. Just that morning I had stood in the garden near a tiny drama like the one you see here (image from 2002) imagining how much better off we’d often be to leave natural systems alone and purge our poisons from the garden shed. That gardener’s insect poison dust sure enough killed some harmful veggie-munchers, but it also disrupted a biological system that …

Leaving Well Enough Alone: Organic Lunch Read more »

Forlorn, I stand in the garden on a warm summer morning. Flowers–of three different beans, squash, tomatoes, cucumbers and corn–are open and ready for business. Or buzziness, I might say. Except in our garden this week, there’s no buzz. I even planted buckwheat for its white flowers to lure pollinators. It isn’t working. And doggone it, the only consistent drone of wings I heard as the sun rose over the ridge and warmed my back were the always-frantic yellow jacket wasps zipping and zinging …

What’s da Buzz: No Bee Biz Read more »

…summertime, and the living is….not terribly picturesque. I tend to take fewer pix in summer than any other season, with the exception of close-ups of insects and garden critters and veggies. So, here ya go… This, for you city types, is a potato flower. Country types will recognise its similarity to the tomato flower, a sound alike name, a close flower family relative among the Solanaceae. Lamenting the lack of pollinators in the garden, that will not keep these plants from producing, as it …

You Say Potato, I Say… Read more »

  Wonderful rain overnight, more probably on its way. The pastures aren’t brown the way they’ve been the past several dry Julys, but the streams continue to fall, so I imagine the same thing is happening to the ground water from which almost all Floyd Countians get their water. We are still some 4 inches behind the “normal”–if we can still use the last 100 years to measure from anymore. So between storms, I will go out for my morning worm picking at the …

Nature Green in Tooth and Claw Read more »

  Another not-fav veggie besides broccoli that is now taking over what little garden space we have inside the “compound” is the trailing vines of the aforementioned butternut squash. Too little bang for the buck, as far as I’m concerned, a single vine requires far more garden square-footage for a pound of produce compared to just about anything else of a more vertical persuasion–like corn or even beans. But the hard Caucasian-colored goard-shaped lumps are highly prized by one of the gardeners who Must …

Tangled Web Read more »