Lots of Moving Parts

I have not decided how, or if, to sustain Fragments at the same time that I am spending most of my tiny stock of writing minutes posting to Substack. I started posting there several years ago when the blog here was badly broken by hackers and was not usable.

Now it is in good shape, but WordPress is much higher friction than Substack, and I am compelled to take the path of least resistance as energies and time are taken by the impending move from Virginia to Missouri.

If that last sentence made you do a double-take, then this series will catch you up on the metamorphosis coming up this late fall. The following installments narrate the plight of what I call “second-stage retirees” who suddenly see, in their mid-seventies, that they can’t do what they’ve always done, which for many means they can live how and where they have always lived.

I invite you to “subscribe” to my Substack space “Earth Alive: Field Notes from the Southern Mountains” where I hope to narrate this personal transplant across half a continent to Columbia, Missouri, where the next chapter of our lives will unfold.

Where the Sidewalk Ends ~ November 29

Things—and Folks—Fall Apart ~ December 4

Things are Looking Up ~ December 20

To Age Well, Start Young ~ December 27

Boomers Got to Have a Plan ~ January 16

Many Hope to Age in Place ~ January 23

One More Move Left In Us ~ January 29

Go West, Old Man   7 Feb

Leaving Home to Find It ~ Feb 15 

Landing on One’s Feet ~ Feb 22

Possible Futures in Possible Places ~ 27 Feb

(3) Country Mouse, City Life – March 6

?NeitherNor ~ March 13?

(2) Within our Grasp – by Fred First March 21

There Are Places I Remember – by Fred First March 30

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fred

Fred First holds masters degrees in Vertebrate Zoology and physical therapy, and has been a biology teacher and physical therapist by profession. He moved to southwest Virginia in 1975 and to Floyd County in 1997. He maintains a daily photo-blog, broadcasts essays on the Roanoke NPR station, and contributes regular columns for the Floyd Press and Roanoke's Star Sentinel. His two non-fiction books, Slow Road Home and his recent What We Hold in Our Hands, celebrate the riches that we possess in our families and communities, our natural bounty, social capital and Appalachian cultures old and new. He has served on the Jacksonville Center Board of Directors and is newly active in the Sustain Floyd organization. He lives in northeastern Floyd County on the headwaters of the Roanoke River.

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